UCD Late Antique and Byzantine Virtual Seminar Series

You are invited to attend a new Late Antique and Byzantine seminar series hosted by the UCD School of Art History and Cultural Policy. Please find the flyer for this term’s seminar programme below.

Sessions will be run on Zoom, and all are welcome to attend; please register in advance at https://ucd-ie.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_kmFoxs03Rd-iyzXDsYF7pw.

The first speaker in our series, on 5 October from 4:00-5:15pm (Dublin time), will be Mikael Muehlbauer (Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies), ‘An Ethiopian “Constantine” in the 12th century: The architecture of the early Zagwe dynasty and monumental ruins’.

Edinburgh Byzantine Studies Seminar Series – Semester 1

The newly established Centre of Late Antique, Islamic and Byzantine Studies (CLAIBS) invites you to attend the Byzantine Seminar Series at the University of Edinburgh.
The seminars take place at 17:15 and will be held via ZoomYou can register by following this link.
Monday, 20 September 2021, at 17:15, Stratis Papaioannou (University of Crete):
‘The philosopher’s tongue: or a short (hi)story of a Byzantine fiction’

Monday, 4 October 2021, at 17:15, Alicia Simpson (American College of Greece):
‘Philippopolis: a Byzantine metropolis in the northern Balkans’

Wednesday, 6 October 2021, at 17:10, Mary Whitby (University of Oxford):
‘An emperor and his poet: George of Pisidia on the Emperor Heraclius (610-641 CE)’
Co-hosted with the Classics Seminar

Monday, 18 October 2021, at 17:15, Julian Baker (University of Oxford):
‘Monetary transformations in western Anatolia in the first decades of the fourteenth century: Byzantines, Turks, and Franks between the Propontis and Rhodes’

Monday, 1 November 2021, at 17:15, Nicole Paxton Sullo (Princeton University):
‘The visuality of memory in later Byzantium’

Monday, 15 November 2021, at 17:15, Tristan Schmidt (University of Silesia in Katowice):
‘Performing military leadership in Komnenian Byzantium’

Monday, 29 November 2021, at 17:15, Pantelis Golitsis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki):
tbc

Collis Lecture (Virtual): Dr. Maria Vassilaki, September 26

“Viewing St. Catherine’s Monastery at Sinai”
Maria Vassilaki, Professor Emerita, Byzantine Art History, University of Thessaly (Volos, Greece), and Member of the Benaki Museum Board of Trustees (Athens, Greece)

September 26, 2pm-3pm EST (USA) via Zoom

THE DR. JOHN AND HELEN COLLIS LECTURE
An Annual Lecture Devoted to Ancient Greek and Byzantine Art

Saint Catherine’s Monastery is located in Sinai, a place associated with well-known events narrated in the Old Testament, making the region the ultimate locus sanctus (holy place). Built in Egypt in the mid-sixth century by emperor Justinian on the site of Moses’s Burning Bush at the foot of Mount Sinai, the fortified monastery remains intact to this day. In this lecture, Maria Vassilaki investigates how and when the Sinai landscape was transformed from a mere background setting into an independent composition.

Forgotten Christianities Seminar Series

Forgotten Christianities is a new initiative sponsored by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) through the ‘Critical Thinking Communities’ initiative and the Ancient World Research Cluster (Wolfson College, Oxford). The first seminars will take place June 7, 14, 21, and 28, 2021.

Three Critical Moments in Caucasian Architecture

Robert G. Ousterhout, Three Critical Moments in Caucasian Architecture

01 June 2021, 3:00pm (CEST) / 9:00am (EDT)

In this talk, I shall examine three important periods in the development of Georgian and Armenian architecture, focusing on what I perceive as moments of creativity and innovation in design, planning, and decorative details. For each ‘moment,’ I shall focus on once specific monument, while attempting to situate it within the broader perspective of Christian and Islamic architecture in the East. Much of what I say will derive from my 2019 book, Eastern Medieval Architecture: The Building Traditions of Byzantium and Neighboring Lands.

Lilith, Xnoubis and the Others: living in-between Faith, Magic, and Spells

Byzantium at Ankara is happy to announce the last seminar of the Spring 2021 Seminar Series; on Thursday 27 May (h. 18.00 Istanbul Time), Sercan Yandim (Hacettepe University) will deliver a paper entitled: “Lilith, Xnoubis and the Others: living in-between Faith, Magic, and Spells.” For further info and registration, go to https://www.byzantiumatankara.net/program-1 or send an email to byzantiumatankara@hotmail.com.

Power of Rhetoric. First OEBG-SPBS Joint Online Lecture

The First Joint Online Lecture of the Austrian Byzantine Association and the Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies. Tuesday, 25 May, 17.00 UK time.
Nikolaos Zagklas, University of Vienna, “The Power of Rhetoric in the Byzantine Classroom and Beyond: Fluid Relations and Intersections between Prose and Poetry.”
Respondent: Foteini Spingou, University of Edinburgh

Oxford Byzantine Graduate Seminar – Summer 2021

Oxford Byzantine Graduate Seminar – Summer 2021
Mondays 12.30 BST, via Zoom. To register, please contact the organiser at james.cogbill@worc.ox.ac.uk

Monday 26th April. Katherine Krauss (Somerville College, Oxford), Rereading the ‘Canon’ in Latin Late Antiquity: Exemplarity and Allusion in Macrobius’ Saturnalia

Monday 3rd May. Alessandro Carabia (University of Birmingham), Defining the ‘Byzantine Variable’ in Early Byzantine Italy: The Case of Liguria (500-700 CE)

Monday 10th May. Cristina Cocola (Universiteit Gent & Katholieke Universiteit te Leuven), Feeling Repentance in Byzantium: A Study on the Literary Sources of Katanyktic Poetry

Monday 17th May. Ben Kybett (Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge), Themistius and the Muses: Religion, Rhetoric, and Classical Statuary in Fourth-Century Constantinople

Monday 24th May. Grace Stafford (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz), Between the Living and the Dead: Use, Reuse, and Imitation of Painted Portraits in Late Antiquity

Monday 31st May. Josh Hitt (St. Hilda’s College, Oxford), Ageing, Rejuvenation and Patronage in Twelfth-Century Byzantium

Monday 7th June. Constanța Burlacu (Merton College, Oxford), Monastic Presence and Book Circulation in the Lands North of the Danube (15th-16th Centuries)

Monday 14th June. Kyriakos Fragkoulis (University of Birmingham), (Re)contextualising a Late Antique City through the Ceramic Record: The Case of Dion in Macedonia (Pieria, Greece)

Women in Sacred Chant: Past and Present

A panel discussion celebrating the vocal ensemble Cappella Romana’s release of Hymns of Kassianí, a recording of newly edited medieval Byzantine chants by the 9th-century composer and poet Kassía. Moderated by Professor Susan Ashbrook Harvey (Brown) and introduced by Professor Alexander Lingas (City and Cappella Romana). Panelists will explore the role of women — as composers and as performers — in sacred Western and Eastern chant from ancient times to the present day, including music by Kassianí (Kassía) and Hildegard of Bingen. This is a history often marginalized or even disregarded in general histories of Christianity, yet it has been — and continues to be — important to the continuing vitality of sacred music as an art form and as a crucial mode of religious expression. Tuesday, 13 April 2021: 18.00–19.30 BST via Zoom.

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