Annual Ptarmigan Mini-Lecture Series at Stanford University

These lectures are designed to provide an overview of a specific author, topic, place, text, or methodology accessible both to specialists in late ancient studies as well as to interested parties outside this field. These five virtual lectures are not modelled on a research talk but rather on a classroom lecture, and they require no prior preparation.
Each event will be exactly one hour long: an approximately 40 minute presentation followed by about 15-20 minutes of curated Q&A.
December 1st, 2021, 6PM-7PM PT:
Professor Nicola Denzey-Lewis, Professor of Religion at Claremont Graduate University, will present “Roman Catacombs.” More information on Professor Denzey-Lewis’ work can be found here: https://www.cgu.edu/people/nicola-denzey-lewis/
January 12th, 2022, 5PM-6PM PT:
Professor Meghan Henning, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Dayton, will present “Hell.” More information on Professor Henning’s work can be found here: https://udayton.edu/directory/artssciences/religiousstudies/henning_meghan.php
February 16th, 2022, 5PM-6PM PT:
Professor Maia Kotrosits, Research Associate, at the University of Waterloo, will present “Fantasy and Late Antiquity.” More information on Professor Kotrosits’ work can be found here: https://denison.academia.edu/MaiaKotrosits/CurriculumVitae
April 13th, 2022, 5PM-6PM PT:
Professor Shaily Patel, Assistant Professor of Early Christianity at Virginia Tech, will present “Magic in Early Christianity.” More information on Professor Patel’s work can be found here: https://liberalarts.vt.edu/departments-and-schools/department-of-religion-and-culture/faculty/shaily-patel.html
May 18th, 2022, 5PM-6PM PT:
Professor Georgia Frank, Charles A. Professor of Religion at Colgate University, will present “Egeria’s Pilgrimage Diary.” More information on Professor Frank’s work can be found here: https://www.colgate.edu/about/directory/gfrank

Ewa Wipszycka’s Warsaw Late Antique Seminar on Thursday, 2 December (4.45 Warsaw time): Adam Łajtar (UW): A new piece of evidence in an old question: A Greek inscription from Tafah and the Christianisation of Nobadia

On Thursday, 2 November (4.45 Warsaw time), at Ewa Wipszycka’s Warsaw Late Antique Seminar, Adam Łajtar (UW) will present a paper A new piece of evidence in an old question: A Greek inscription from Tafah and the Christianisation of Nobadia. We are meeting in-person at the Library of Papirology and Roman Law (UW main campus) but Zoom participation will also be possible at the this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87050765768
Abstract
The subject of my presentation will be a Greek inscription painted on a wall of the church arranged in the so-called south temple at Tafa (Lower Nubia). Until quite recently, the text was known only through an imperfect facsimile made in 1819 by Franz Christian Gau, a French architect of German origin. Gertrud van Loon managed to identify among papers of an English aristocrat William John Bankes a much better facsimile of the inscription in question, made towards the end of 1818. Thanks to this facsimile, it is possible to establish that the inscription came into being on the occasion of the consecration of the church after its renovation. Retrospectively, the text mentions two further events: the original consecration of the church and the introduction of the Christianity to Nobadia, and gives the name of the then reigning king. Thus, it contributes considerably to a much debated question of the Evangelisation of Nubia.
Forthcoming papers
9.12: Jakub Łojszczyk (UW) Fragments regarding the alliance with ‘Turks’ as an example of ethnographic categories and Kaiserkritik in the History of Menander the Guardsman
16.12: Przemysław Nehring (Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika), Praktyka i teoria epistolograficzna w listach Augustyna
13.01: Adam Ziółkowski (UW), A case of collective amnesia? Why did the Western Romans of the 4th century know so little about the 3rd century crisis of the Empire?
The full programme can be found at the seminar’s website: http://lateantiqueseminar.historia.uw.edu.pl/content/harmonogram-schedule

Byzantium in Mainz & Frankfurt lecture series – “Religious Conflict and Mobility, 700-900: Byzantium and the Greater Mediterranean in a New Project”

Byzantium in Mainz & Frankfurt lecture series
“Religious Conflict and Mobility, 700-900: Byzantium and the Greater Mediterranean in a New Project”
Dr. Federico Montinaro (Tübingen) und Joe Glynias (Dumbarton Oaks/Princeton)
30 November 2021, 6:15 p.m.
This talk was originally scheduled to take place in person, but will now be on Zoom; those interested in attending should register at byzantinistik@uni-mainz.de. The original description of the talk can be found in the attached brochure.

Late Antique Seminar: Coptic texts of ritual power as voices of laypeople?

On Thursday, 25 November (4.45 Warsaw time), at Ewa Wipszycka’s Warsaw Late Antique Seminar, Przemysław Piwowarczyk (University of Silesia) will present a paper Coptic texts of ritual power as voices of laypeople?. We are meeting in-person at the Library of Papyrology and Roman Law (UW main campus)but Zoom participation will also be possible at this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83501284547?pwd=aWt5a1Jla2ZmbUgzN1lyL0c4N1lsUT09
Abstract
My seminar paper is an attempt to identify the literary production of lay Christians writing in Coptic. Among the literary pieces in Coptic, there are certainly some composed and/or written by laypeople; however, a positive evaluation of such authorship is usually impossible. The monastic or clerical link is equally hard to prove directly. Nevertheless, it often functions as a default interpretation. The paper’s title is appended with a question mark since I propose not hard evidence but a cumulative argument that I test as a reasonable hypothesis. I am convinced that the texts of ritual power (‘magical texts’) give us a unique chance to catch laypeople’s writing. In my argument, I refer to three different source corpora: the text of ritual power themselves (internal evidence), church canons concerning magic, and narrative texts portraying magicians (external evidence).
Forthcoming papers
2.12: Adam Łajtar (UW), A new piece of evidence in an old question: A Greek inscription from Tafah and the Christianisation of Nobadia
9.12: Jakub Łojszczyk (UW) Fragments regarding the alliance with ‘Turks’ as an example of ethnographic categories and Kaiserkritik in the History of Menander the Guardsman
16.12: Przemysław Nehring (Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika), Praktyka i teoria epistolograficzna w listach Augustyna

The Christos Paschon: Byzantine tragedy or non-liturgical passion play?

The Inaugural Mathews Byzantine Lecture, by Professor Emerita Margaret Mullet (OBE): “The Christos Paschon: Byzantine tragedy or non-liturgical passion play?”
Time: Thu Dec 2, 2021, 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: Medieval Institute Main Reading Room and Live-Streamed on our YouTube channel

The Medieval Institute is pleased to announce a new annual lecture series, the Mathews Byzantine Lectures. The Mathews Lectures bring a distinguished scholar of Byzantine studies to campus each year to deliver a talk, supported by the Rev. Constantine Mathews Endowment for Excellence in Byzantine Christianity in the Medieval Institute.

Mary Jaharis Center Lecture: The Sound of the Lectionary

The Mary Jaharis Center is pleased to announce our second lecture of 2021–2022: The Sound of the Lectionary: Chant, Architecture, and Salvation in Byzantium. In this lecture, Roland Betancourt, University of California, Irvine, considers the ways in which notions of salvation were sonically articulated in the Divine Liturgy during the Middle Byzantine period. Tracing the Gospel lectionary from text to illustration to recitation, Professor Betancourt explores how Byzantine artists produced a unified experience that took into consideration not only the text of the Gospel, but also how it would appear to the reader and his audience within the context of the Divine Liturgy.

Tuesday, November 30, 2021  | 2:00–3:30 pm (Eastern Standard Time, UTC -5) | Zoom
The Sound of the Lectionary: Chant, Architecture, and Salvation in Byzantium
Roland Betancourt, University of California, Irvine

Advance registration required. Registration closes at 11:00 AM (EST) on November 30, 2021. Register: https://maryjahariscenter.org/events/the-sound-of-the-lectionary

Part of the Boston Byzantine Music Festival Lecture Series exploring the musical heritage of the Byzantine Empire. The Boston Byzantine Music Festival is a program of the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture.

Contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Byzantine Dialogues from the Gennadius Library: ‘By this conquer’: Relics as Weapons in Byzantium

Byzantine Dialogues from the Gennadius Library: ‘By this conquer’: Relics as Weapons in Byzantium
11/16/2021 7.00pm (Greece) – 12:00pm EST (USA)
PRESENTED BY
The Gennadius Library
SPEAKERS
Brad Hostetler, Kenyon College
Abstract
The weaponization of relics in Byzantium is attested in chronicles, military treatises, and inscriptions. This practice began with Constantine I, who, according to Eusebius, made a copy of the “sign” from his vision and carried it into the battle at Milvian Bridge. From that time forward, Byzantine emperors were accompanied on campaign with sacred objects, including relics of Christ, the Mother of God, and the saints. The sacred remains of holy figures were believed to be the protectors of, and divine aids to, the troops, the emperor, and the empire. One of the richest sources on this practice are epigrams that are, or were, inscribed on reliquaries. They document the power that was invoked to ensure victory over one’s enemies—both spiritual and earthly. This lecture examines the material and rhetorical strategies of epigrams, and the ways in which the visual and textual programs of reliquaries communicated and activated the martial function of relics.
About the speaker
Brad Hostetler is Assistant Professor of Art History at Kenyon College. He specializes in the art and material culture of Late Antiquity and Byzantium, with a focus on portable luxury objects from the ninth through the twelfth centuries. His research focuses on the relationships between texts and images, including ekphraseis about, and words inscribed on, works of art. He is currently working on a book that examines the nature and meaning of relics and reliquaries in Byzantium through the lens of inscriptions. His work has been supported by grants and fellowships from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

East of Byzantium Lecture: Eternal ‘Silk Road’?

The Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, are pleased to announce the second East of Byzantium lecture of 2021–2022.

Monday, November 15, 2021 | 12:00 pm (Eastern Standard Time, UTC -5) | Zoom
Eternal ‘Silk Road’? The Rise of Sogdiana during the 3rd–4th Centuries A.D.
Sören Stark, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University

Sören Stark will discuss the rise of Sogdiana as one of Eurasia’s economic power houses during Late Antiquity.

Advance registration required. Registration closes at 9:00 AM (ET) on November 15, 2021. Register: https://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/

East of Byzantium is a partnership between the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, that explores the cultures of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine empire in the late antique and medieval periods.

Contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Byzantium at Ankara: Fall-Winter Seminar Series and Byzantine Music Workshop/Symposium, 11-12 November, 2021

We are happy to announce that Byzantium at Ankara is back with its brand new Fall-Winter Seminar Series.

On top of our “traditional” online lectures (scheduled for the month of December and featuring Dr. Elisa Tosi Brandi (University of Bologna) and Dr. Federica Broilo (University of Urbino), we are particularly proud of presenting students, scholars, and enthusiasts with an exciting initiative: a Workshop/Symposium on Byzantine Music entitled “Strolling through Echoes of the Past,” which will take place at Bilkent University on 11th and 12th November 2021. The Workshop/Symposium stems from a collaborative effort of Bilkent Saygun Center, Koç University-Stavros Niarchos Foundation, Bilkent Department of History, Byzantium at Ankara, Hacettepe University, and Hellenic Mediterranean University.

The event will include two morning sessions (in person) with the participation of students (max 15 due to Covid restrictions) who will be focusing on learning about Medieval and Byzantine music notation and chant under the supervision of Dr. Antonis Botonakis (Hellenic Mediterranean University).

We, therefore, invite students who are interested in participating in the workshops (to be held in the mornings of Thursday 10 and Friday 11 November at Bilkent University- FEASS Building, C Block Amphi) to register to abotonakis@hmu.gr. We regret that we could not offer accommodation or any reimbursement for travel expenses to those students who do not live or study in Ankara. Previous knowledge of Byzantine or Western notation is required.

These morning sessions will be followed by two afternoon sessions (hybrid) in which the world-famous composer Dimitri Terzakis, Cenk Güray, Alexander Lingas, and Antonis Botoniakis, among the others, will be delivering papers on Byzantine and Medieval Music Theory as well as on the influence of Ottoman culture on Modern Turkish and Greek music.

18th Rydén lecture – From Byzantium to ‘Byzantine’: how to approach medieval Greek literature today

You are cordially invited to the 18th lecture in the memory of Lennart Rydén (1931–2002), professor of Byzantine Studies at Uppsala University 1980–1996.
Thursday, 14 October 2021, 18.00 (6 pm), local time, presented in Zoom by the Newman Institute in Uppsala:
https://stockholmuniversity.zoom.us/j/64410211736
Meeting ID: 644 1021 1736
(host: Helena Bodin, <helena.bodin@littvet.su.se>)
From Byzantium to ‘Byzantine’: how to approach medieval Greek literature today
Ingela Nilsson, professor in Greek and Byzantine Studies, Uppsala University, and Director of the Swedish Research Institute in Istanbul, will look at the development of the study of Byzantine philology over the past couple of decades: the turn from texts as sources to texts as literature, the implementation of critical theory and the introduction of cross-cultural perspectives.
The event includes a book launch, starting at 19.00 (7 pm):
Reinhart Ceulemans and Barbara Crostini present their edited volume Receptions of the Bible in Byzantium: Texts, Manuscripts, and their Readers (Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2021), available in open access: http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2%3A1472780&dswid=1454

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