Job: Cappella Romana Director of Publications, Grants, and Operations

Cappella Romana is hiring
Director of Publications, Grants, and Operations
Cappella Romana is seeking to fill a new position of Director of Publications, Grants, and Operations beginning at the earliest 15 October 2021. The director will assist Cappella Romana’s Executive and Musical Directors in developing and executing initiatives to fulfill and support Cappella Romana’s mission: to combine passion with scholarship in its exploration of the musical traditions of the Christian East and West, with emphasis on early and contemporary music.
The ideal candidate will possess: a) a master’s or doctoral degree with specialization in the music, art, history literature, or theology of the churches and cultures of Eastern Christianity; and b) directorial, managerial, or administrative experience in academic, educational, or cultural organizations.
Please send a letter of application, résumé/CV, and a writing sample of one or more of the following: grant narrative, promotional/blog/fundraising copy, and/or short academic article.
Please send all materials in one PDF to jobs@cappellaromana.org
Initial deadline 6 October 2021; Open until filled.

William Sanders Scarborough Fellowships

THE WILLIAM SANDERS SCARBOROUGH FELLOWSHIPS
Deadline: January 15, 2022

This fellowship is intended to honor and remember Professor William Sanders Scarborough and to help foster diversity in the fields of Classical and Hellenic Studies and the Humanities more broadly by supporting students and teachers from underrepresented groups in their study and research at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens.
William Sanders Scarborough (1852–1926), the son of an enslaved woman and a freedman, was a pathbreaking African American Classical scholar and public intellectual. Scarborough’s scholarship included philological works on Greek and Roman authors, as well as studies of African languages and African American folklore. His First Lessons in Greek (1881) was the first foreign language textbook by an African American author. He taught at Ohio’s Wilberforce University and Payne Theological Seminary, serving as Wilberforce’s president from 1908–1920. At least twice in his life (1886 and 1896), Scarborough hoped to attend the American School, with the encouragement of the School’s Managing Committee. Lack of funding, coupled with his many professional responsibilities, kept Scarborough from realizing his dream of going to Greece.
Eligibility:  Graduate students, faculty members (K-12 and all levels of post-secondary education), and independent scholars residing in the United States or Canada, regardless of citizenship, whose geographic origin, diverse experiences, and socio-economic background are underrepresented at the School (including persons from the Black, Indigenous, and Persons of Color communities), and whose studies, research, or teaching would benefit from residency at the School. Fellowship recipients need not be specialists in the field of Classical Studies. The School welcomes applicants from faculty of K-12 schools and from students or faculty from public and private universities, colleges, and community colleges; and encourages applications from Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
Terms and Duration:  The fellowship supports up to three months in residence at the School to carry out proposed research projects, to join the School’s academic programs (field trips and seminars during the regular academic year or the summer, excavations at the Agora or Corinth, scientific field schools, etc.), and/or to develop knowledge, resources, and collegial networks to enhance their teaching. Applicants interested in using the fellowship to participate in summer programs should also submit separate applications to relevant programs of interest. Applicants to the Scarborough fellowship program wishing to be considered for summer programs in 2022 should contact the ASCSA Programs Administrator at application@ascsa.org for further guidance. Applicants wishing to use the Scarborough fellowship to offset costs of participation in the Regular Member academic program of the School must also apply directly for Regular Membership. The fellowship may not be held concurrently with Regular Member Fellowships.
Awards granted in the January 2022 competition should normally be used between June 1, 2022 and May 30, 2023.
Each of the awards provides for $1500 per month (rounded upwards to the nearest whole month to a maximum of 3 month) as a stipend. The fellowship provides room and board at Loring Hall, a waiver of any applicable School fees, and one roundtrip economy-class airfare to Athens. The School intends to make up to four such awards each year.
Application: Submit an online application here, https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/171376/william-sanders-scarborough-fellowship. A complete application will include:
  • A 2-page, single-spaced, statement indicating your eligibility, describing the proposed use of the fellowship including any formal program at the School you plan to apply for, the proposed timeframe for your work at the School, and your project or research goals (as applicable).
  •  A curriculum vitae.
  • A copy of current transcripts for student applicants (scans of official transcripts are acceptable).
  • Arrange for two letters of recommendation. Once an online application is submitted, recommenders will be sent an automated email with instructions about how to submit their letters of recommendation. Recommenders will be asked to upload their letters via the online application system, Submittable. It is also acceptable for recommenders to submit letters directly to this email address: application@ascsa.org.
For more information: https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/fellowships-and-grants/graduate-and-postdoctoral#Scarborough

Questions? Contact: application@ascsa.org

Award decisions will be announced in March 2022.

“Slaying the Dragon: Byzantine Survivals in the Greek War of Independence” Virtual Lecture Announcement

Slaying the Dragon: Byzantine Survivals in the Greek War of Independence
Date: Saturday, October 2nd at 1pm EDT
Where: Via Zoom
The lecture will focus on an aspect of the Greek War of Independence that calls for answers to questions as basic as they are elusive. What role did the Byzantine heritage play in conceptualizing, representing, or animating the struggle against the Ottoman Empire? What strands of Byzantium were foregrounded and through which mechanisms did they find a place in the collective imaginary of the period? In what ways was that process of reception and signification manifested, and to what extent? How can it be studied and properly understood today?
The event is cosponsored by the UCLA Stavros Niarchos Foundation Center for the Study of Hellenic Culture (https://hellenic.ucla.edu/) and Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC. Her Excellency Alexandra Papadopoulou, Ambassador of Greece to the United States, will provide opening remarks.
Nikos Panou is assistant professor of comparative literature and Peter V. Tsantes Endowed Professor in Hellenic Studies in the Department of English at Stony Brook University. His current research focuses on articulations of power and authority in pre-modern moral and political discourse, with emphasis on advice literature and related genres. He has written on topics ranging from Byzantine historiography to seventeenth-century satire, and has coedited a volume on conceptions of tyranny from antiquity to the Renaissance with Oxford University Press.

Region and Enmity: A RaceB4Race Symposium, October 19-22, 2021

Region and Enmity: A RaceB4Race® Symposium
The symposium is being held virtually from October 19-22, 2021 and will include panels, informal coffee talks, an editor roundtable, and 1-on-1 sessions with invited editors.

Enmity is a sustaining force for systemic racism, a fervent antipathy toward a category of people. Enmity exists at the nexus of individual and group identity and produces difference by desiring opposition and supremacy, imagining separation by force, and willing conflict. Enmity unfolds in different ways in different places, according to local logics of territory, population, language, or culture, even as these geographical divisions are subject to constant change.

This interdisciplinary symposium, hosted by Rutgers University, focuses on how premodern racial discourses are tied to cartographical markers and ambitions. The notions of enmity and region provide a dual dynamic lens for tracing the racial repertoires that developed in response to increasingly hostile contention between premodern cultural and political forces. The symposium will invite scholars to take up this intersection between region and enmity, and to examine how belief in difference, or the emergence of polarizing structures and violent practices, configured race thinking and racial practices in ways that are both unique to different territories and that transcend them.

Register for the event: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/region-and-enmity-a-raceb4race-symposium-tickets-165791636247

Learn more about RaceB4Race: https://acmrs.asu.edu/RaceB4Race

International Forum on the Venizelou Metro Station, Thessaloniki

Institute for Advanced Study and UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology present
AN INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON THE VENIZELOU METRO STATION, THESSALONIKI
Sunday, September 26
9:00 AM (PST) / 12:00 PM (EST) / 7:00 PM (Greece)
The uncovering of unique Late Roman and Byzantine remains in the course of excavations for a new metro system in Thessaloniki has called into question how a country comes to terms with the treatment and display of its material past. This international forum aims to present factual information about the significance of the finds, review decisions made by the Ministry of Culture and the Central Archaeological Council concerning the Venizelou Station remains, summarize past and ongoing litigation in Greek courts, and discuss the practical solutions offered by engineers. Following brief presentations by four speakers, listeners will be able to ask questions about the remains, the solutions to the technical challenges that their preservation on site presents, and their significance for the city’s future.
Speakers:
  • Angelos Chaniotes, Professor of Ancient History and Classics, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton
  • Costa Carras, Founder of ELLINIKI ETAIRIA-Society for the Environment and Cultural Heritage / EUROPA NOSTRA Council member
  • Vlasis Koumousis, Professor Emeritus of Structural Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, National Technical University of Athens
  • Maria Mavroudi, Professor of History and Classics, University of California, Berkeley
Moderator: Sharon Gerstel, Professor of Byzantine Art and Archaeology, UCLA
Please register below:
Bit.ly/VenizelouMetro
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Simultaneous translation into Greek will be available.

ASCSA Summer 2022 Programs

Summer 2022 Program Opportunities

The American School of Classical Studies at Athens was founded in 1881 to provide American graduate students and scholars a base for their studies in the history and civilization of the Greek world. Today it is still a teaching institution, providing graduate students a unique opportunity to study firsthand the sites and monuments of Greece. The Summer Session and Summer Seminars allow students, scholars, and teachers to experience Greece first-hand with on-site learning. Deadline: January 7, 2021
Scholarships Available for All Programs

2022 Summer Seminars
Eighteen-day sessions designed for those who wish to study specific topics in Greece and visit major monuments with exceptional scholars as study leaders, and to improve their understanding of the country’s landscape, history, literature, and culture. Choose one, or both(!), seminars – seminar topics change every summer.

Aegean Networks of Technology (June 6-24, 2022)
This seminar will explore four fundamental technologies in ancient Greece (ceramics, wood-working, stone carving, and bronze-casting) and how craft practitioners shared their expertise in multi-craft projects, such as building a boat or a temple. Participants will discover how these networks of technology developed in a broad Aegean context, from Athens and Corinth on the mainland to the Cycladic islands of Naxos, Paros, and Santorini, and in a deep time frame, from prehistory to contemporary traditional practices. Taught by Professor Eleni Hasaki, University of Arizona.

The Northern Aegean: Macedon and Thrace (June 30 – July 18, 2022)
In this seminar, participants will explore the Northern Aegean region during various time periods. The history of Macedon and Thrace bridges the East and West and offers a glimpse into some of the most significant developments in Greek history, such as colonization, cross-cultural relations, the Persian Wars, Athenian hegemony, and the rise of Macedon. Taught by Professors Amalia Avramidou, Democritus University of Thrace, and Denise Demetriou, University of California, San Diego.

2022 Summer Session
Six-week intensive introduction to Greece from antiquity through the modern period. The program provides the most extensive exposure to Greece, ancient and modern, for participants with interests in Classics and related fields. A strong academic component with participants researching and presenting topics on site. Offers unique opportunities to interact with eminent archaeologists in the field.

For 2022, the Summer Session (June 13-July 27, 2022) will be directed by Professor J. Matthew Harrington, Tufts University. Roughly half of the session is spent in travel throughout Greece. Three trips give participants an introduction to the major archaeological sites and museum collections throughout the country. The extended trips vary from session to session, but traditionally include six days on Crete, ten days in the Peloponnese, and a week in Northern Greece. Roughly, 60 sites and museums are visited. The remainder of the session is devoted to study of the museums and monuments of Athens and the surrounding area with day trips. While in Athens, members visit and study the city’s important monuments and sites.

Every participant gives two on-site oral reports of about twenty minutes each. Report topics are selected in consultation with the director, taking into account participants’ interests and skills.

East of Byzantium Lecture: Cosmopolitanism as Hospitality

The Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, are pleased to announce the first East of Byzantium lecture of 2021–2022.
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 | 12:00 pm (Eastern Time, UTC -4) | Zoom
Cosmopolitanism as Hospitality: Christian Charity and the Archaeology of the Medieval Silk Road in Armenia
Kate Franklin, Birkbeck, University of London
Kate Franklin will discuss piety, patronage, hospitality, and hotels in medieval Armenia.
Advance registration required. Registration closes at 9:00 AM (ET) on October 5, 2021. Register: https://eastofbyzantium.org/upcoming-events/
East of Byzantium is a partnership between the Arthur H. Dadian and Ara Oztemel Chair of Armenian Art at Tufts University and the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture at Hellenic College Holy Cross in Brookline, MA, that explores the cultures of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine empire in the late antique and medieval periods.
Contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

“Curating the Art of the Global Middle Ages” VIRTUAL ROUNDTABLE

The Delaware Valley Medieval Association (DVMA) invites you to attend its fall 2021 symposium “Curating Art of the Global Middle Ages,” Saturday, September 25, 1-4pm (EST).
The event will consist of a roundtable in which participants will reflect upon recent and current curatorial projects as presented in short, prerecorded talks (the talks, listed below, can be accessed here):
Andrea Myers Achi
Assistant Curator, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
“Curating The Good Life: Reflections on organizing an exhibition about joy in 2020”
Kristen Collins
Curator of Manuscripts, J. Paul Getty Museum
and
Gerhard Lutz
Robert P. Bergman Curator of Medieval Art, Cleveland Museum of Art
“Romanesque Reimagined: Curating across Disciplines”
Amanda Luyster
Senior Lecturer, Visual Arts Department, College of the Holy Cross
“Old, Valuable, and Strange: Medieval Practices of Collection and Modern Global Exhibitions”
Risham Majeed
Associate Professor, Department of Art History, Ithaca College
“Primitivism before/beyond Modernism”
Elizabeth Dospĕl Williams
Associate Curator, Byzantine Collection, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection
“Transformative Processes and New Global Narratives: Reimagining the Permanent Byzantine Galleries at Dumbarton Oaks”
Space for this virtual event is limited, and registration is required.
Information about registration, links to the prerecorded talks, and relevant bibliography can be found on the event website: https://curatingartoftheglobalmiddleages.blogs.brynmawr.edu/
The symposium is co-sponsored by the Center for Visual Culture, the Program in Museum Studies, the Program in Middle Eastern Studies, the Program in Arabic, and the Office of the President of Bryn Mawr College and organized by Alicia Walker (awalker01@brynmawr.edu).

Job Announcement: Hellenic Canadian Congress of BC Chair in Hellenic Studies, Simon Fraser University

The Department of Humanities at Simon Fraser University invites applications for a full-time appointment of a scholar who will hold the 5-year, renewable Hellenic Canadian Congress of BC Chair in Hellenic Studies, starting July 15, 2022. This position is advertised as open rank and will be filled by either an Assistant Professor or Associate Professor. A candidate for a junior Chair (Assistant or Associate Professor rank) will be a scholar who has a record of scholarly achievements well beyond that normally expected of a faculty member in that rank and who, based on their accomplishments to date, has the clear potential to make an extraordinary contribution to their discipline. Only those eligible to be appointed to the rank of Assistant Professor or Associate Professor will be considered. Appointment with tenure at the Associate Professor rank is possible.
Excellence in research and teaching are the primary criteria for this position. Candidates must have research expertise either in Greek Language and Literature of the Late Antique and Medieval periods or in the History of Art of the Byzantine era. Additional linguistic or regional expertise will be welcome. The ideal candidate will have a successful record in their chosen specialization and be well regarded in their field. Applicants must hold a completed PhD in any one of the following fields: Classics, Philology, History of Art, or a clearly related area of expertise (e.g. History with demonstrated Philological grounding or Religious Studies with Philological and Art Historical expertise).
Duties will include research, teaching courses at the undergraduate level, graduate supervision, university service, and outreach both within the university and in the wider community. Ability to teach outside the advertised disciplinary focus, notably in other specializations within the broader umbrella of Hellenic Studies and Humanities (Ancient and Modern Greek Art or Literature and Language, or Medieval Art and Literature of the wider world around and beyond Byzantium), will be assessed positively.
The successful candidate will develop courses that effectively integrate their field of expertise into the curriculum and research profile of the Department of Humanities, as well as actively engaging in the research and outreach activities of the Department and the affiliated Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF) Centre for Hellenic Studies.
SFU is consistently ranked among the top comprehensive universities in Canada. The Department of Humanities is a union between the Department of Humanities and the Hellenic Studies Program (since summer 2020) that reflects their shared commitment to dialogue across cultures in a manner that engages with ancient traditions and their receptions, by way of ideas, texts, and art. The Department boasts expertise in Classics, Classical and Early Christian Archaeology, Byzantine and Early Modern History, Modern Greek Literature, and Balkan History, as well as other areas in Humanities, including Asian Studies. More information about the department and the university can be found on our website at http://www.sfu.ca/humanities.html.
The holder of the Hellenic Canadian Congress of BC Chair in Hellenic Studies will work closely with the members of the SNF Centre for Hellenic Studies – in which they will assume active membership – to meet the mandate of the Chair’s Terms of Reference in a manner most conducive to strong research output and robust outreach among communities of Greeks and philhellenes in BC and the world over. The SNF Centre for Hellenic Studies at SFU is a leading site for the study of Greece’s history, language and culture. More information on the Centre may be found on its website: www.sfu.ca/hellenic-studies.html.The SFU campus is located on Burnaby Mountain in Metro Vancouver. Vancouver is a scenic waterfront city situated minutes from the mountains and a wide range of outdoor activities. It has a reputation as a clean, safe, multicultural and ethnically diverse city and is consistently ranked as one of the very top cities in the world in which to live and work.
All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, qualified Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Simon Fraser University is an institution whose strength is based on our shared commitments to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Diversity is an underlying principle of our Strategic Vision, which pledges SFU to “foster a culture of inclusion and mutual respect, celebrating the diversity reflected among its students, faculty, staff, and our community.” SFU is committed to ensuring that no individual is denied access to employment opportunities for reasons unrelated to ability or qualifications. Consistent with this principle, SFU will advance the interests of underrepresented members of the work force, specifically Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, racialized persons, and women; embrace gender and sexual diversity; ensure that equal opportunity is afforded to all who seek employment at the University; and treat all employees equitably. Candidates that belong to underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged to apply.
Applications will be reviewed starting November 30, 2021, and will continue until the position is filled. Applicants will submit electronically a cover letter, CV, statement of research interests, teaching philosophy and SIX academic letters of reference. Original letters of reference should be submitted by the referees directly to Dr. David Mirhady, Chair of the Appointments Committee. Complete applications should be sent in pdf format c/o carolyn_richard@sfu.ca.
We acknowledge the Squamish, Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh, Katzie and Kwikwetlem peoples, on whose traditional territories Simon Fraser University’s three campuses stand.  By recognizing the Unceded Traditional Coast Salish territories, we aspire to create a space for reconciliation through dialogue and decolonizing practices.
The position is subject to availability of funding and the final approval of the Board of Governors. Under the authority of the University Act personal information that is required by the University for academic appointment competitions will be collected. For further details see: http://www.sfu.ca/vpacademic/Faculty_Openings/Collection_Notice.html

CFP: “Representations and Interpretations of the Passion and Death of Christ: Global Perspectives”

This Special Issue aims to bring a wide range of scholars who work on passion subjects in different time periods and geographical regions together to examine representations and interpretations of Christ’s passion and death from a global perspective, and across all Christian denominations, on a large canvas. Possible topics for articles include: patristic imagery for Christ’s passion; relics of Christ’s passion and their legends; artistic representations of Christ’s passion; the influence of apocryphal writings on Christ’s passion on vernacular religious literature; pilgrimages, shrines and devotional practices associated with Christ’s passion; the passion of Christ in medieval preaching exempla; the passion of Christ in hymnody; the passion of Christ in sermons; the passion of Christ in devotional treatises; the passion of Christ in prayer books; the material culture of Christ’s passion—relics, paintings, crucifixes, medals, religious prints, holy cards, etc; the passion of Christ in mystical literature; the passion of Christ in religious folklore; passion plays, medieval to modern; the passion of Christ in warfare; the passion of Christ in world literature and film, and its reception, and so on.

Given that a vast body of literature exists relating to the study of representations of Christ’s passion and death, this Special Issue particularly welcomes articles which highlight lesser-known or localized manifestations of passion devotion, especially those which have not yet appeared in scholarly literature in English.

In order to facilitate the gathering of the richest collection of material, this issue welcomes articles of various lengths, from c. 5,000 words to c. 15,000 words.

Please send all expressions of interest to Prof. Dr. Salvador Ryan, Faculty of Theology, St Patrick’s College Maynooth, Salvador.ryan@spcm.ie.

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